CMH Gourmand

Culinary Discovery & Misadventures in the Ice Cream Capital of the World (Columbus)

  • Recent Comments

    Babette on Thanksgiving 2015 PSA
    Loree Thompson on The Original Crispie Creme Don…
    AlohaJo on Slice of Clintonville: A Servi…
    mjb on Slice of Clintonville: A Servi…
    cmh gourmand on Lisska Bar and Grill: Crossed…
    Gus W on Lisska Bar and Grill: Crossed…
    willie on Jimbo’s Burger and Biker…
  • CMH Gourmand – “a twitter”

  • Categories

  • Top Posts

  • Archives: August 2006 to Now

El Ranchito and My Southside Adventure

Posted by cmh gourmand on November 26, 2015

A friend of mine started raving about a Mexican Restaurant over the past summer. Since the world of Taco Trucks and authentic Mexican cuisine are in my domain and because I sustained a 7 month internment in Grove City he assumed I was aware of all south side establishments of this ilk. The more he talked about it throughout the summer the more I became intrigued. The downside, this friend does not pay much attention to restaurant details (well let me be honest, most people do not to the level I do – because they are, well, normal) so he had no name and a vague sense of location. Fortunately, I have experience going off on adventures with little to no information and perhaps the possibility of danger such was the case for my south side adventure.

If the south side was to have a mascot, it would the character Pig Pen from Peanuts. No matter where you go – there seems to be a little cloud of dust floating around nearby. The area is a little rough around the edges but in my eye that only adds character. However, neither aspect of the area helps when wandering around looking for a Mexican Restaurant. But my persistence paid off eventually and near the intersection of Brown Road and Hopkins Avenue I found El Ranchito.


The small lot was full and the place had rustic look that usually is a sign of potential good food but while swinging around the rear to look for a parking space I found a surefire sign that this place would be at least well above average……a little bit of culinary history.


It seems the original Taco Nazo food truck has been in storage here for over a year and the owners know Quicho, the owner very well. While they have no plans of running a food truck, they do offer a taco truck style menu and do quite well with it.


The kitchen is small, not much bigger than a food truck and the menu is the same size. This spot just does the basics but they do them well. If you are looking for a taco truck experience but you want to sit at a table to wait and dine this is the place you have been looking for.


So, that was not much of an adventure, just a lot of driving, however if you are going to head to the south side you might as well make a day of it, so I should note that just next door to El Ranchito is D & E Z O’s Pizza. This place gets high marks from many in the area and when I used to offer the Pizza Grand Prix we could always plan on someone making the trek to Old North Columbus to share D & E Z O’s with the masses. So I’s suggest ordering a pizza while you eat a taco then taking the pizza home for later.


But wait there is more. I drove by a sketchy bar call Bullshotz. I had a compulsion to check the place out. Good sense would have caused me to drive on but something in my DNA fueled by more than a few missions to locate my father in bars like this, drove me back to the parking lot to check this place out. Parking in the lot, I found a nice watch lying in the mud, which gave me an excuse to walk in….and have the ability to walk right out….so I proceeded in spite of a bit of fear. Please note, if you go to Bullshotz there is a one foot drop from the door to the floor. My guess is this is a cheap security system or litmus test however I have good balance and no one was looking so I still had the chance to blend in the with crowd. It took about 10 seconds to determine that I could never blend in at a spot like this. The did turn the watch into the bartender who looked like a fairly attractive professional ultimate fighter just starting retirement and discovered that the place features a regular lunch and dinner menu, that looked OK. Now you are prepared for your own South side adventure. Good luck!

Posted in culinary misadventure, restaurants | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

Thanksgiving 2015 PSA

Posted by cmh gourmand on November 23, 2015

First, this semi-annual joke from Pierce Brothers Cleaners never gets old.

Turkey cleaning

Honeykiss Bakery stopped taking pie orders last week.

Just Pies stopped taking orders last week too. But you have a couple options. There might be a couple of pies you can get at the retail stores on Tuesday. At the Clintonville/Worthington Store you can pop in at 2 pm and try to buy any unclaimed pies before they close. It is good people even if you do not get a pie.

Last but not least, a nice Thanksgiving tradition to start is to go to Smokehouse Brewing for an early morning beer and watch people pick up their Thanksgiving catering orders for the day.

Posted in food | 1 Comment »

What’s Up at White Castle: Turkey, Breakfast and Whatnot

Posted by cmh gourmand on November 13, 2015

As some readers are aware, I’ve written about White Castle before. I have a compulsion to try new products when they release them to the masses. I don’t love White Castle but I have always respected the company and their institutional commitment to innovate.

First for discussion, Turkey Sliders….just in time for the holidays.


I tried the Turkey Dinner Slider: square (Butterball) Turkey patty, a big squirt of cranberry sauce and in my case a giant malformed sweet potato waffle fry. Verdict, one was enough. If you want to save some money I would suggest ordering the Cranberry Turkey Slider for 40 cents less and investing that savings in a full order of Sweet Potato Waffle fries. I’m glad I tried this concoction, don’t get me wrong but this is a novelty item but a destination sandwich.


Second for discussion, Breakfast 24/7.

White Castle beat McDonald’s to the punch in making breakfast an all day affair. This pleased me immensely because as many readers know, breakfast is my fourth favorite meal. Other than anything at Starliner Dinner, anything served at Explorer’s Club and home fries with sausage gravy at Nancy’s, there is only one other breakfast item that I ever crave – the White Castle Breakfast Sandwich. I order the version on the bun (not the toast option) with egg, sausage and cheese. Doing very thorough analysis, this is the best value of any White Castle menu item. And since I am typically not near a White Castle at traditional breakfast times, being able to get this sandwich anytime has guaranteed a significant higher volume of consumption on my part. Good job White Castle.


Third for discussion, smart ingredient integration that gives the customer the sense of an upgrade.

White Castle takes a clear plastic cup, fills it with Sprite and adds a dash of cranberry juice and markets it as a Cranberry Spritzer. Genius way to up sell a product using what they already have in-house.


Stay tuned for my next White Castle adventure….whenever a new product rolls or slides out.

Posted in culinary knowledge, Food For Thought, sandwiches | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

R.I.P. Rigsby’s Kitchen / Cuisine Volatile

Posted by cmh gourmand on November 9, 2015

Rigsby’s Kitchen or Rigsby’s Cuisine Volatile if you have been around town a while, closed it’s doors this past weekend. It had a good run lasting from February 1986 to November 2015 in the same location and with the same owner which is impressive in the restaurant game. And when the doors closed the food was still good, the reputation still in high regard and the experience still special. Rigsby’s did not die out due to a loss of food quality or falling behind the times. While many reasons have been speculated on, a part of the demise is due to the success of the restaurant and the area it helped grow around it. Rigsby’s was a pioneer in the Short North in an age when the neighborhood still had shades of a red light district and the shadow of the Short North Posse in its aura. In an era before the Convention Center and downtown living, setting up business on the Short North was a risk. Owner Kent Rigsby took that leap of faith and in the process helped draw new people and new development to the Short North.

I won’t go on about meals I’ve had or for some of you readers meals you may not have had a chance to enjoy. I only wrote about Rigsby’s once – and I wish I had done so more. For me, Rigsby’s was a favorite place to eat during an OSU home game when I could plan on having the spot to myself.

Instead of food I’ll mention a few things that Kent Rigsby contributed to the Columbus dining scene during the lifetime of the restaurant, so in no particular order: he helped bring the Mona Lisa mural to the Short North, A James Beard Award Nomination in 2012, K2U, Eleni-Christina Bakery (named after his daughter), The Flatiron, Tasi Cafe, serving on the board of Dine originals, many top 10 of Columbus Dining awards and Ray’s Living Room (an art gallery).

Rigsby has never been one to toot his own horn or maintain a status quo for too long so I am sure the end of Rigsby’s means something creative and/or culinary somewhere down the line from Kent Rigsby.

If you care to share your own memories or comments on Rigsby’s, I’d love to hear them – comment away.

Posted in restaurants | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Slice of Clintonville: A Serving of Community

Posted by cmh gourmand on November 5, 2015


Tonight I served as a judge for the second annual Slice of Clintonville, an evening of all you can eat pizzas from the greater Clintonville area. This was the first year for judging so my honorable colleagues and I had the daunting task of tasting and evaluating three to seven types of pizza from each of the following: Ange’s, Bella Pizza, Donatos, Hounddogs, Lucky’s, Mama Mimi’s, Mikey’s Late Night Slice, Pizza House, Sbarro (open 4 days just down the street), Smiths Deli, Villa Nova and Z Pizza. If you are now full from reading that imagine how I feel right now.


We opted to try to tame that overwhelming variety by getting creative with our criteria. We tasted the standard Pepperoni pie from each place then compared our top three choices among the three judges to determine best in show. Then each of us picked our favorite specialty pizza for an honorable mention. The end result: Pizza House was our winner. Late Night Slice, Hounddogs and Mana Mimi’s got Honorable Mention and Villa Nova received the diversity award for their Taco Pizza. The People’s Choice award went to Mama Mimi’s. It was a good showing by all.


There are many events in Columbus – typically too many to choose from. Some are too big, some are too small, a few too frequent and a very small number are just right. This is a true community event, at least for me. I was able to judge with Nick from Breakfast with Nick and spend some time with his family. I was able to sample pizza and catch up with friends from Late Night Slice and Hounddogs that I work with on the Pitchers and Pizza Tour and see other that I have known for years serve pizza from their shops and see neighbors I have known, in some cases all my life, enjoy the fruits for these local pizza slingers. And finally a few Clintonville charities were able to show off what they do. It is hard to create an event that truly represents the community but Slice of Clintonville is just that a slice of what the community has to offer. See you next year.

Posted in Clintonville, pizza | Tagged: | 2 Comments »

4 String Brewing: Four Years and a Beer

Posted by cmh gourmand on October 26, 2015


For the last four years, October has been a big month for Four String Brewing’s Dan Cochran. In October 2011, after months rehabbing an old machine shop, Four String was born just ahead of the Columbus Craft Beer Boom 2.0. In 2012, the space was taking shape with some retail customers including the BW-3 (Buffalo Wild Wings to you millennials) across the parking lot and some momentum. Cochran was working by day and brewing by night and picking up extra equipment where a small budget on a debit card would allow. In 2013, October was a double blessing. Changes in regulations allowed Cochran to open a bona fide taproom so that people drop in for a pint instead of a taste and a growler fill that felt like something clandestine. Cochran added a new baby Cochran to his team as well. Things were looking up and Cochran was fully invested in brewing full-time. As fall of October 2014 arrived Four String was committed a big jump to partnering with a distributor and starting to can beer to get it to the masses. As canning became a weekly ritual (and rite of passage for many loyal volunteers) the cans took hold of a large market and a tipping point tipped.

This year, October is still a big deal for Four String. A new production brewery on the “near west side” is cranking out kegs, casks and cans, Cochran has or will soon add another baby to the brood, and the taproom is transformed after a few days of hard work (last week) has doubled in sized as a new space even long time regulars would not recognize. Things are looking good for Four String and as a business that literally started on a shoestring that is a big deal. And because that is a big deal Four String is going all out with a four year anniversary party paired with Halloween and a BIG bottle release. The party is October 31st at the Taproom and it should be a doozy.

I won’t invest too much time writing about the bottle that is being paired with the party since it will probably be gone by the time you get there (and if you are not reading this before October 31st 2015, just skip the next paragraph). The Solo Series, has become a signature of the brewery and will be a selling point for the taproom, is a periodic release of limited number of small batch beers that you will never see again. This anniversary edition is an Imperial Stout aged in OYO (Middle West Spirits) Bourbon barrels. The ABV (alcohol by volume) comes in at 10.8% but tastes like at least a bourbon shot more. I was lucky to get an advance bottle to try. Leading tours on Saturdays is counter productive to getting solo series bottles or the traditional Saturday casks so this was a real treat for me and it will be for you (go early and take friends to get some).


OK, so all of this is well and good, a four year anniversary party, a bottle release and a lot of new-found elbow room to celebrate of this. But as they say at Commfest, this is a party with a purpose. While that might now be apparent, the purpose (I have proclaimed) is to remind Columbus Citizens that craft beer is a big deal in Columbus. That is cause to celebrate and Dan Cochran and his team worked their asses off to contribute to this growth – that deserves a tip of the hat and a raise of a pint glass.

There is a lot more to the story of Four String (if you want the full scoop – join Columbus Brew Adventures on the Grandview Brewery Tour or the pitchers and pizza tour) but I’ll stick to the bullet points. Cochran found a passion for home brewing while in college but he focused his energy on another passion – Rock and Roll. He played bass for a series of local bands including Big Back Forty and Feversmile. Not having a million dollars saved up as well as jumping into the craft beer pool just before it was filled, Cochran has to find another path to starting a brewery. He opted to create a Franken-Brewing system (a term he did not know until after he finished it). Collecting used dairy tanks as well as a tank from the local Marzetti plant, Brass Knuckle Pale Ale starting pouring our of those tanks instead of milk and ranch dressing. It took a lot of McGuyvering to make all of that work, but it did and it got Four String on the market ahead of the other upstart breweries in town and well…..the rest is history. Most of those original tanks have been removed and repurposed but the story still remains and some different tanks are coming back to the taproom to keep unique and one off beers pouring for the regulars that have come to call the taproom home.

October 31st is more than a bottle release and party at Four String, it is a celebration of a dream. I’m raising my glass below.


Posted in beer | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

Ohio Donut Trail (Seasonal) Circle S Farms

Posted by cmh gourmand on October 21, 2015

Fatherhood and my stewardship of CMH Griffin took me south of I 70 to what turned out to be a mainstay of greater Grove City, Darbydale, Groveport and points beyond – Circle S. Farm.

The farm opens for seasonal events including Fall Fun Days, so it was decided by a power greater than me (Mrs. Gourmand) that we would be having fun.

Before I forget, here are two critical tips to better enjoy your trip.

1) Go early to beat the swarms – plans on lots of bees at Circle S. and plans for their numbers to rise as more people come and spill sweet things that attract more bees. And come early to beat the swarms of people and the long lines they bring because this place fills up fast. On a Sunday go before the church crowd gets out so you can have a pretty fun time to explore the farm on your own without having to dodge all the city and trailerslickers.

2) Buy a couple packages of the day old donuts, they are a great value and you will need supplies for the drive home.

When we arrived, I saw the sign below and opted to treat my next step as one of the choose your own adventure books of my youth. I decided my adventure would start with food by turning right towards food instead for left to the hay barn.


My vision of food options was a paper plate with some donuts from a box on an old card table…that was very much not the case. There are two food areas at the farm located side by side. One section is set up like a concession stand at a high school football game – you can choose from bean soup, chicken and noodles, chili, hot dogs and cold apple cider. All except the cider are homemade. The chili was OK, the chicken and noodles were bland but featured very fresh and well cooked chicken.


Next door, there was a small store and full service bakery with an array of goodies, mostly donuts. The bakery space is a pretty tightly run operation with more commercial equipment that I have seen in many year round bakeries. I sampled several of the items avalable but the must try are the donuts, they were all exceptional. In fact so exceptional as to warrant a listing in the Ohio Donut Trail. There were eight to ten varieties of donuts including the ubiquitous Ohio Fall flavor of pumpkin, a maple glazed donut, coconut, a powered sugar donut, several with nuts sprinkled on top and a few with chocolate glaze. Each version sampled was good while the pumpkin and maple were exceptional. The good news here is that you can go to the farm store directly and avoid admission fees so it is an option to limit your fun to just buying donuts from the shop and you can stock up by buying the day old donuts by the dozen at $4 per pop.


Circle S Farm
Circle S Farms
9015 London Groveport Rd. (St. Rt. 665)
Grove City, OH 43123
United States

Posted in bakery, donuts, Ohio, Ohio Donut Trail, Road Trip | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

The Nine Year: A) Itch, B) Stretch, C) Anniversary D) All of the Above

Posted by cmh gourmand on August 26, 2015

It has been a tradition for this blog to recognize the last year of CMH Gourmanding with a reflection on the launch date anniversaryn to include some thanks and a look forward. Welcome to the end of the ninth year of eating with me. It has been a busy year.

There definitely is an itch. An itch to rebrand the blog, to write more, to write better, to hit the road or ride to the end of the street to discover something new or rediscover something that was forgotten. But I won’t be scratching those itches much. Nine years is a long stretch. Nine years is a lifetime in the blogging world. I have seen many people start a blog strong then very quickly go long stretches without posting and then sputter out. I have seen a few – not many – end a blog well – with a great sign off or an insightful or meaningful denouement. Most old blogs don’t die, they just fade away.

So the year leading up to the diamond anniversary begins with semi-retirement or dormancy. The next 365 days may mark the end of this blog. I’m not sure if the next 1-12 months will be a hibernation, a sabbatical or capitulation. Blogging has been more chore or a duty than a passion in 2015. And frankly, this blog is not what it used to be (and the readership attests to that). I don’t get out much anymore. I’m not the first guy at the unknown and undiscovered places and my words have a little less zing and a lot less alliteration. And when it comes to it, blogs are so – 2000, it ain’t what it used to be and there are a lot of new kids on the block (and in my old man voice, I don’t think many of them do that great of a job and are too focused on promoting themselves).

Mr. Man

Gourmand Junior is here and needs my attention as I Mr. Dad around town looking forward to introducing him to his first foods. My wife is not miserably pregnant anymore and her tibia, fibia and ankle have mended, CMH Tobias is mostly healthy again and the Gourmand Abode is finally – almost finished – after a year of renovation, in part by Gourmand General Contracting. Brew Adventures has been going well but needs even more attention and focus from me I want to grow the empire bigger and better before we get too far away from the second anniversary of the business.

If I get the gumption to do ten posts from now until August 2016, then I will do a tenth anniversary recap and see where we go from there. Good eating all.

Posted in Food For Thought | 1 Comment »

Food Truck Basics: How to Make a Good Start on Wheels

Posted by cmh gourmand on August 9, 2015

I was recently casing out a new food truck and found myself going through a mental check list of what they were doing right. Using the criteria I established, I determined that this truck, which just launched a month ago has what it takes to (probably) survive the first critical year of business.

This litmus test was developed from several different sources and experiences:

1) A life time of eating
2) Eating from almost every food truck in the city and writing about many of them
3) Graduating from the Art of The Cart course at Hot Dog University in Chicago
4) Working customer service (in emergency situations) on several trucks
5) Two years of service at Knights Ice Cream as a worker, supervisor and working the mobile ice cream truck
6) Two years as coordinator at the Food Fort, an incubator for food based businesses
7) Hours and hours of conversations with Jim Pashovich, the owner of Pitabilities
8) Hours of “philosophy” sessions with the owners of OH!Burgers, Ajumama and Flattop Pizza

So here is what I and looking for in a new mobile food business:

1) Distance Presentation: Customers decide to eat from fifty feet away, so your truck “wrap” or graphics need to convey what type of food you serve. It you can’t do that, it should at least be clear that your mobile operation serves food and is not a delivery truck or backdrop for graffiti. Smart operators will all make sure they have something aromatic on the grill (onions, cinnamon, etc,) that will lure in customers by smell.

2) Your Name gets customers in the Game: Just like the look of the truck, the name of the operations should very quickly let customers figure out what type of food is served. If the name does not spell that out clearly, then you need to have a very short tag line underneath that sums it up in a few words. And example of a bad name choice, Stacy’s 5 Dollar Hollar. The name has scared more customers away that the promise of a bargain priced meal.

3) Uniform(ity)((s)) does not equal conformity: While the goal of most mobile food operators is to showcase their individuality and uniqueness and to shed the images and stigma of mass-produced food. While many may not like it, it is still critical to stay on brand and have some type of uniform or uniformity to what staff wear. While, this does not have to look like a bad fast food parody, it still is worthwhile to make sure people can tell any member of your team from a customer. It can be a hat, T-shirt and/or apron to stay on brand with a uniform and show subconsciously that you are a team.

4) Come early and stay til the end: As a past food truck event planner and frequent customer, there are / were certain trucks I knew would be late and not ready to serve at game time. That not only sets a bad tone for developing a relationship with a site or event, it also costs customers. If your hours are posted as 5 pm and you are not ready to serve, you lose those customers that showed up on time to beat the crowd. And those customers are your most important customers to nurture because their enthusiasm could be channeled into repeat business and free brand ambassadorship, instead they feel their extra effort was dismissed. The same applies to leaving early. Yes, sometimes a place is a dud or the weather sucks or whatever, but when you pack up early without a very good reason then the image of your business is that you don’t keep commitments.

5) Price point is the point: I’ve known some great mobile operators that made incredible food, but they lost customers because they charged $15 for a sandwich. While quality is important even more so is price and at a deeper level, value. While food quality for a truck is typically as good or better than an average restaurant, customers do not expect as much or more for a mobile meal than a sit down meal. As a general rule, the average person will pay up to $6 or $7 for a lunch and $8 to $12 for a dinner. And if they like the food and you can meet that price, the customer will come back. And if you struggle to meet that price point then add perceived value. Make the entrée look like a meal by adding a small 3-4 bite garnish to the main entrée to make it appear to be more (than what it is).

6) Be Clean in All Things at All Times: Cleanliness is beyond Godliness in mobile food. There is still some of the street meat stigma to food on wheels. Your truck needs to look clean from the outside and inside. Your team needs to have clean(ish) clothes and you should go out of your way to show off your dedication to food safety with people changing latex gloves, cleaning inside when not serving and keeping the profanity to a minimum too. In the early days of fast food (White Castle) projecting cleanliness was the most important thing to do to get customers to your door and today, you need to do the same to get them to your window.

7) Customer Service starts before the order and continues after:: Greet customers, answer stupid questions, occasionally offer samples but also make sure you have printed menus people can look at or take with them, have plenty of trash cans and keep them from overflowing, make sure to go orders are packaged to survive the journey and offer to correct any real or perceived failing with a smile on your face. Returning all phone calls, answering all e-mails and listening to feedback comes into play here as well. And the 1000 other things related to customer service have to be executed with excellence every time.

As a small business owner as well, I have seen businesses do the above and bomb, but their odds of success are pretty high if they can execute these “surface” elements of mobile food. Behind the scenes the biggest challenge for most mobile operators is maintaining true food costs to under 30% of operating expenses and paying attention to the business part of the business with the same intensity as the passion for the food.

While the above are important, in any small business there are 100 things you need to do everyday to do well and stay profitable, but in mobile food, if you can knock these seven things out of the park at the beginning your chances of seeing your second year are strong.

Posted in Behind the Counter, Mobile Food | 1 Comment »

Mad About Making Cider at Mad Moon Cider!

Posted by cmh gourmand on July 29, 2015

One of the best things about Columbus Brew Adventures is the diversity of people I get to work with and learn from. Several months ago I met Peter Moon, one of the owners of Mad Moon Cider at a tasting. After trying his products and hearing a bit of his story, I knew I had to get some tour groups into his space. I tested out the concept with private groups over the winter and each trip there was a crowd favorite. At each tour, I picked up a bit more of his story while meeting his wife and cider making partner Sally. I really became hooked on the craft of craft cider.

When Peter mentioned that they sometimes need volunteers to help with cider production I promptly volunteered. Then the stars and the Moons aligned and I had my opportunity to report for duty. Our team was small – the two Moons, myself and a fella I think may one day become a folk legend, Vic. I’ll digress about Vic for a bit. Vic has been there, done that, survived countless mishaps and misadventures and somehow thrives on doing great acts of endurance and physical strength – most of this seems to be fueled by a daily regimen of honey, apple cider vinegar and some assorted juices. As I observed at the end of my service, if Vic had lived in an earlier era, we would today measure speed and production on Vicpower, not horsepower.

Anyway, step one of cider production is the sort apples. In our case, we had some multiple 800 lb crates of apples that had been stored over the winter. While these apples make great cider, they also require significantly more sorting than other batches. If you have heard the phrase “one bad apple spoils the bunch”, it is true and we had to search for them among 1000’s of apples in each crate.


As the apples get sorted into milk crates and buckets, the apples go down a chute of a device that looks a lot like a chipper to get mashed into apple pulp.


The pulp gets wheeled over to get crafted into sheets of “cheese”. The job of the cheese maker is to take scoops of pulp, and using a plastic mold and cheesecloth, create squares of apple pulp to stack on other squares to slide down to a press to squash (with 1000’s of pounds of pressure) to create juice.




Once the press gets going, the juice really starts to flow (down a long open trough) to a bin. Once the bin gets to a certain height, a pump gets switched on to transfer the juice to a holding tank (during my tenure I think we made about 300 gallons over four hours). After the pressing, the square molds are unfolded to start the “cheese” making process again. After the pulp is mashed, the residual looks like a very dry energy bar made by an eighties era hippy.


All in all, I was a great afternoon. If you are familiar with the story of John Henry (there is a statue down where my kin reside) if there was a production contest between a machine, Vic and myself, Vic would beat the combined efforts of the machine and my human self. It was hard, messy work but worth the effort. You can see my work shirt below….taken near the beginning of my labors.


For my efforts I was rewarded with good company, a nice lunch and plenty of cider to take home.


Others things I could do in the future include bottling and capping, using the equipment you see below. The capper is pretty amazing, it was made out of a broken drill press Peter picked up for $50 (worth more than that by weight alone at a scrap yard) and mounted with a special capping mold he found on the internet. The MacGuyvered tool works like a charm. In fact much of what is in the cider house is customer made, crafted, reverse engineered and conjured up which is the nature of any small start up business. Mad Moon has a lot a stories to share and these are just a few of them. (FYI: the next Columbus Brew Adventures Tour to Mad Moon is August 30th).



Posted in Behind the Counter, beverages, culinary knowledge, Locally Sourced | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 275 other followers