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Leftovers: F. Scott Francis Interview Outakes

Posted by cmh gourmand on June 28, 2014

The Summer issue of Stock and Barrel has a story I wrote about the Johnny Appleseed of Columbus Brewing, F. Scott Francis, here is the -> LINK. It was a real joy to get to know Scott and get to know more about his brewing life.

As part of the interview, I asked him to answer some questions as a sidebar to the story, I have that “bonus” posted below. I’m looking forward to learning about and maybe writing about some of our other pioneers in town like Victor Ecimovich who brought back the Hoster name in the late 1980’s.

A serving of craft beer wisdom from F. Scott Francis.

On the current movement to raise the alcohol by volume (ABV) limit to 21%.

Raising the limit to 21% is worth pursuing but other recent developments have helped local breweries more. Going to 6% was very important; it allowed brewers to brew out of a narrow range of styles. The progression to 12% allowed many new beers to come into the state and allowed local brewers the freedom to brew a much wider range of styles such as Russian Imperial Stouts. The Taproom law changes of a few years ago were also very important. As for a 21% ABV beer, those are much more challenging to brew, requiring a lot more yeast and specialty ingredients and in the end are not very profitable or sustainable for a brewing business.

Advice for budding brewery owners:

Having money for a lot of new equipment does not equate a successful brewery. If you have to manage your resources spend a little more on the brewer, which will give you a better chance of creating beer that is appealing to your intended customers. Don’t name your beers before you brew them (which can type cast them). Name the beer after you create it and taste it.

Advice for new home brewers

The first thing I tell people is to use a good quality yeast. Also have your primary fermenter surrounded by water, which will help to control the heat. A lot of heat is generated in the first few days of fermenting so controlling the heat will keep the yeast from racing. If you have time and space, do two batches exactly the same but finish one with your fermenter surrounded by water and the other without the water. You will be amazed at how different the two will taste. Talk to as many experienced home brewers as you can before you immerse yourself on Internet brewing sites.

Difference between brewing in the 1990s and brewing in 2014.

In the early days the challenge was getting people to try the beer. Today you have a big cross-section of customers of all ages and all levels of craft beer knowledge who are more willing to try new beers. Customers want flavor. Making beer that people want to buy is harder than making a beer style that is technically correct and consistent. Because you made it right does mean it will taste the way the customer expects it or wants it.

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